[ad] Empty ad slot (#6)!

Why We Like Small Trees

You may be trying to add more trees to your backyard but do not know what to choose. Maybe you are scared of starting a forest as trees tend to grow, and grow, and grow. You could possibly just want some little accent to a deck area or around a pool. Nevertheless, it is important to consider a few things before planting a tree in your garden. To start with, make sure you do your homework to determine how big the tree will become. Here are a few small trees that you may want to grow in your garden.

Maples are members of the Acer (Aceraceae) family, a Latin word which means sharp, in reference to the tree’s leaves. Maples include both shrubs and trees which could develop to 150 feet tall. The Paperbark Maple could mature to 30 feet tall with a spread of up to 15 feet. The name “paperbark” refers to the trees paper-like bark. It is a cinnamon brown with a peeling look. The tree’s leaves are three to five inches wide. The leaves are green in the summer and are a mix of reds, yellow and orange in the fall. The Paperback Maple grows best in full sun or partial shade.

(C) Better Homes and Gardens

(C) Better Homes and Gardens

Ah, the Japanese Maple. So what can we say about this beautiful tree? It’s elegant, it’s colourful and it’s a wonderful addition for any yard. It also comes in various varieties like weeping and upright so it may go almost anywhere. It is just a great small shade tree and at it’s most mature it will not grow more than 30 feet tall and wide, and the pretty leaves! Such pretty leaves. The Japanese Maple does best in zones 5-8.

If you’re looking for a tree that has something to provide all year round then you have found it in the Washington Hawthorne. In late spring you will definately get lovely white flowers. In the summer you have the texture and colour of dark green leaves and once fall hits, you can expect red and orange leaves to grace its branches. It isn’t done then though, as deep into winter you continue to see clusters of red berries against the graying sky. The one downfall is that yes, it has thorns, but that is a small price to pay for all that interest. This tree does best in zones 4-8.

The Eastern Redbud opens spring by having an explosion of pink flowers and it is flexible to a great deal of soils. It is great for yards within zones 4-9 and at full height it’s going to only be around 30 feet. What a great way to decorate your yard!

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


+ 2 = ten

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>