[ad] Empty ad slot (#6)!

PROTECTING YOUR HOME FROM TERMITES IN THE CEILING

Termite damage seems to be a growing problem, especially in areas where moisture and humidity are high. Even if you live in a dry environment, termites can still be a problem, especially if there is moisture from water leaks and water leaks come from leaky pipes and roof damage.

 

Like any wooden structure in your home, your roof can be vulnerable to damage from termites in the ceiling. Both subterranean and drywood termites can pose a threat to the integrity of your roof, inhabiting areas of your ceiling, including around fireplaces where leaks have occurred and over bathrooms where excessive moisture may be trapped underneath the insulation.

Drywood termites live and feed inside wood. They can establish colonies inside ceiling rafters, roof beams, eaves and other wooden structures associated with your roof. Drywood termites can even establish colonies underneath wood shingles.

Unlike drywood termites, subterranean termites typically build their colonies in the soil. However, subterranean termites will build colonies in any area where they have access to wood. Dampness provides a more conducive environment for infestation, but is not required. All they really need is a way inside your house. Worker termites build “mud tubes” inside of walls and chimneys in order to access food sources. Termites will feed on any substance containing cellulose. Drywall, wallpaper, clothing and even carpet in your home can be susceptible to damage in case of a termite infestation.

The invasive Formosan or “super termite” is the subterranean termite species most likely to construct above-ground colonies in addition to their primary ground nest. Formosan termite colonies can be much larger and more destructive than those formed by native termite species.

While you should rely on a trained professional to inspect and treat any possible termite in ceiling infestations in your home, you can look for the following warning signs:

  • Loose roof tiles or shingles. Even if your roof does not have wooden shingles, your subroofing almost certainly contains wood.
  • Bubbling and discoloration similar to water damage on your ceilings.
  • Any areas of buckling or sagging in your ceilings.
  • Mounds of what look like tiny wood pellets (termite fecal matter known as “frass”) in your attic and/or underneath your rafters may indicate a drywood termite infestation.

 

Read more: https://www.terminix.com/termite-control/termite-signs/damage/ceilings/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


× 6 = eighteen

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>